CEO thanks vets who saved his dog with $6m Super Bowl ad

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He was featured in WeatherTech's 2019 Super Bowl LIII commercial.

MacNeil refused. Instead, he brought Scout to the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine and begged them to help his beloved dog.

The 30-second commercial, funded by MacNeil's company WeatherTech, features the 7-year-old golden retriever at UW-Madison, strolling alongside the real-life pet doctors who saved his life. I'm like 'I'm not putting that dog down. "There's just absolutely no way", said MacNeil, who is the founder and CEO of WeatherTech, an auto accessories company.

Thanks to the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Scout immediately underwent chemotherapy and radiation, and his future started to a bit brighter.

A United States man is thanking the vets who saved his dogs' life with a whopping $8.9 m Super Bowl ad.

In just one month Scout's tumor had decreased 78 percent in size and was 90 percent smaller by September.

To express his appreciation, and to raise awareness about cancer in dogs, the CEO bought a $6 million advertisement will air during the Super Bowl football championship in USA.

In July 2019 the Mac Neils traveled to UW Veterinary Care where Scout received chemotherapy radiation therapy and immunotherapy
In July 2019 the Mac Neils traveled to UW Veterinary Care where Scout received chemotherapy radiation therapy and immunotherapy

Less than a year after the July 2019 diagnosis, Scout has been deemed a cancer survivor. Today, the tumor has "all but disappeared", per UW SVM.

The ad, which features Scout's story while the dog runs along a beach, encourages viewers to donate to the schools' veterinary research.

David MacNeil with his dog, Scout.

"We're very grateful to David MacNeil for taking the time and certainly the financial resources to create that commercial for the Super Bowl cause that's an audience of over 100 million people", said Dr.

"I hope it has a positive impact on cancer for the animals and people all over the world", Macneil said.

'This is an unbelievable opportunity not only for the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the School of Veterinary Medicine, but for veterinary medicine worldwide, ' dean of the School of Veterinary Medicine Mark Markel said. Notably, naturally occurring tumors in dogs are known to share almost identical traits to human cancers, regarding recurrence, metastasis (spread) and treatment response, among other characteristics. The goals are to better diagnose, treat and prevent cancer and identify new drugs and treatments using the funding.

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